Category Archives: skepticism

World War Reality II – Hypnotic Illusion

big-brother-obamaBarack – Grand Magician

World War Real – Part I

And from Misinformation onto Illusion…

Think on this – Illusion

Ultimately, much of what we understand to be “information,” may, in fact, be misinformation.  Information creates our own personal illusions about reality.  These illusions may be personal or social.  And, naturally, personal understanding affects an individual’s social understanding. Much like the North versus South conflict previously discussed, the conflict itself acts as a misinformation indicator.  The most heated conflicts in human interaction have political and/or religious roots.

First, let’s explore events of mass illusion.  The year was 1979, and Joe Newman presented free energy to the world with his latest “energy machine” design.  Scientists scoffed while he quickly gained popularity and reached stardom.  Despite all of the sophisticated reason scientists threw at it, people cheered Newman on.  People simply wanted to believe – and, well, they did.  Joe represented a symbol of hope.  He came from a humble background, and was a high school dropout.  Newman was the people’s hero during his moment in the spotlight – a scientific revolutionary!

With the country inspired by the free energy fire, Joseph Newman spoke of godly visions and waved Einstein’s Theory of Special Relativity around.  Newman claimed that God appointed him as “steward for his gift,”  and explained that energy is sustainable at the speed of light.  Through using Einstein’s equation and visions, Newman appealed to disassociated authorities.  This obscured any authority’s identity through the devices of a largely scientifically uneducated society, and an unknowable god.  In effect, Newman created and continued to fuel this mass illusion of hype, hope, and an American dream.

Unfortunately, hope cannot defy the laws of thermodynamics.  Law one, or Conservation, overturned any probable notion of the perpetual motion device ever creating energy.  Law two, or Entropy, shut Newman’s case down completely – As, it states that when energy is expended, there will always be a loss.  Joe always boasted of what miracles the machine could never do, nor, would he ever be able to demonstrate.  The scientific community sharply debunked Newman’s claims with what is now taught in an introductory Physics course.

Street magicians such as David Blaine and Criss Angel would later rush in once again to steal our hearts, leaving us filled with mystery and awe believing that these gurus somehow gained insight into the metaphysical realm(s).  Angel walked on water, floated from building to building, while Blaine could throw a poker card at a moving bus window and make it appear on the other side.  Blaine wrote his book “Mysterious Stranger,” only to cast more shadows over his act.  He revealed some simple “magic” tricks, but offered spiritual advice, as well – never fully uncloaking himself.  Angel landed a TV show.  Both magicians pulsed through the internet on Youtube videos.  Angel caught my eye when he walked on water.  People were swimming underneath his feet while he was crossing over a hotel pool to illustrate that there was no solid platform underneath him.

Acts like those of Blaine and Angel swept the nation because they preformed with no pre-rigged stage to assist them.  Some people were convinced that they were performing real magic because the no “smoke and mirrors” environment made their acts seem impossible.  However, their fame was short-lived, and simply exposed by critical thinkers.  Both magicians used similar methods in their performances.  They utilized the entire shroud of the internet to distract the audience.  They would perform basic tricks in front of real enthusiasts and tape their reactions.  Then, they would later return to the area and use machines, props, and other tools of their trade that would have been easily spotted by the gawking crowd, earlier.  For example, Blaine would stage a partner inside the bus to stick an identical poker card to the one he would throw at the bus on the inside of the window.  Chris angel used cranes to “levitate” from building to building.  Angel also used clear, hollow (this explains people swimming under his feet), plastic boxes to walk across the water on.

Another interesting feat is “cold reading,” and the general science of hypnosis. Both, “cold reading” and mass hypnosis exploit subconscious suggestion.  In “cold reading,” a person claiming to be a “psychic” will say a basic, and very common name aloud – asking the crowd if anyone knows a “Bob” or “Michael,” or “Susan”…etc.  An even simpler tactic just uses a letter for the read.  Naturally, a member in the crowd will excitedly jump out of their seat and give up a name that it may be.  Then the “psychic” plays off of the information given, and may “cold read” for further information.  Mass hypnosis is can be simply powered in the same manner – by an idea.

Weapons alone, do not kill people, but beliefs doHitler commanded and army with an idea. Saturated with Hitler’s propaganda, the German Third Reich society became convinced that the Jewish people killed their Lord and savior. Ready and willing, the army took up the sword of vengeance and moved on their perceived enemy. Aldolf Hitler’s tactics are sickening, but he was not the first war commander to use this method.  Not by any measure.  Information is the very fulcrum, upon which social leverage functions.  Information is the axis upon which the social world spins.  Information becomes an idea when believed in, and a force of nature when fueled by emotion.  In Hitler’s case, the emotion of love and other honorable and ethical notions were channeled into a system of ideas grounded in a pre-existing framework of the nation.  Hitler simply stoked the embers Martin Luther left behind – igniting a white hot fire, religious in nature. Did Hitler invent this form of social control? Not by any means. The ancient Mayans were convinced that the gods would not let the sun shine until a sufficient amount of human blood was offered.  The ancient Egyptians are said to have believed that their rulers were gods, themselves.  This belief fueled war and slavery alike. In his book, “The Art of War,” war master and descendant from a rich bloodline of war advisors, Sun Tzu (500 BCE), named religious faith as the “first constant.” in successful warfare:

The Moral Law causes the people to be in complete accord with their ruler, so that they will follow him regardless of their lives, undismayed by any danger.

History is rich with other examples, as well.  In conclusion – massive cultural alignment, or paradigm, is catalyzed by a very religious type of faith. In ancient tribal traditions, the spiritual advisor, or, Shaman of the tribe, was/is placed beside the King, or tribal leader.  In terms of cultural alignment, the Shaman’s advice wields the highest appeal to authority – even placed beyond the influence of the tribe’s Alpha male.  Also, another mysterious example of illusion is the Tibetan Tulpa Effect (must read – very interesting) .  All these examples denote instances, if not constants, of mass illusion – from Hitler to the tribal Shaman.

However, mass hypnosis is not so complex in models illustrating its effects on smaller group dynamics. A religious faith emotionally charges ideas, but is not the only game on the block.  Social dynamics allow for a variety of “controls.”  Peer pressure, non-religious ethically charged forms of leadership (aka – political ideologies), societal values, social deviance, in group/out group dynamism, sub-cultural facets, and other pockets of social/group motives may all be culprits of mass illusions. Yet, inducing hypnosis is as simple as planting an idea through a sleight of hand delivery – or, tapping another’s subconscious.

Current U.S. president, Barack Obama, not only monopolized on the minority vote simply by being a minority himself, but flawlessly executed other key tactics of mass hypnotism by sparking positive associations with his campaigns.  Obama demonstrated textbook propaganda techniques in wording “hope,” “change,” and his platinum hit “Yes we can!” in his speeches.  These simple techniques touched on deeper levels within the democratic identity of American policy.  Obama hit the very mark to ignite cultural alignment – And, with both tact and precision.  His win was a easy prediction to call from my perspective. Now, if only we could bet on it, haha. I could make quick and lofty financial gains every four years.  But, with all his hope preaching, the national economy still plummeted as projected, and he finished where his predecessor, George W. Bush left off.  Since then, we’ve seen criminal corporate bailouts, the passing of more laws, the unnecessary expansion of government, and…I’ll just stop there.  I do have a larger point here.

There are several options to choose from when a U.S. voter registers, but since the presidency in America was established, two primary groups have been the only players in the presidential circuit.  In the beginning, there were Federalists and Anti-Federalists.  The two groups changed their game uniforms up, and are now the Republican versus Democrat false dichotomy.  It’s amazing what linguistics can achieve.  Unfortunately, this is where class division begins.  And, by class-division, I mean social inequality.

To restate the thesis of this writing series – Misinformation instills a mass illusion creating social inequality, and thus establishes ranks of enslavement.  

Social Inequality will be thoroughly discussed in the next piece of this series.  Stay tuned! Sources will be cited eventually!

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World War Real – Part I

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My apologies.  I realize that this piece paints a very dark picture, but as I see it, this is a world photograph.  A very real and animal world that needs an aware population.

Things were much simpler when survival and some sense of fulfillment arose from simplistic successes.  Some species became expert defenders and food source specialists.  Other species found successful survival through will, size, strength, and might.  Humans ended up somewhere in the middle, but it is strongly theorized that our ingenuity, intelligence, cunning, and complex social dynamic developed through necessary measures linked to our survival just as any other apex species.

Today, the humans stand at the height of success in surviving the throes of reaching contentment in our attainment of necessity.  Many of us enjoy the comforts of security, but not all of us.  Unfortunately, even the apex predators of the world face danger, and naturally, mortality.  In the face of such odds, ideals of peace are not much more than curling whisps found in the dissipating vapors of hope.

Typically, apex hierarchies do not display cannibalistic behavior, but all threaten other members of their species.  For example, male lions challenge other males for the rights to their pride.  At times, this fight ends in death. If the challenging lion defeats the pride male, he will kill all of the cubs in the pride and prime the females to bear his offspring. This sounds gruesome, and, it is, but it is not much different than a human war.

1) Infiltrate the territory.
2) If successful – eliminate all potential threats.
3) Assume possession of the territory’s resources.  

The primary difference here is that the opposing forces are equal in many respects, and this is one on one combat.  Human tribal conflicts may have once been as simple as a lion taking a pride, but today, the tools of war have taken far different shape.

Illusion, Misinformation, Social Inequality, and ultimately, Enslavement are much more effective tools for conquering a territory with the aim of utilizing all of its resources. Instead of mindless lines of people running into each other with swords and shields, modern warfare is largely psychological.  We have evolved – to “kill” one another.  How does this invisible war work?

Misinformation instills a mass illusion creating social inequality, and thus establishes ranks of enslavement.  

I fully understand that the above sentence is both confusing and a mouthful.  However, we can demystify with basic concepts taught in critical thinking.

Think on this – Misinformation:

First, let’s dissect the word misinformation: In simple terms, it denotes obscured information.  Modern technology offers up a myriad of media, sources of information, and can mast disassociated authority as a beacon of truth.

Disassociated authority is a form of authority that cannot be substantially accounted for and is the source of misinformation.  It may be difficult, but think about the influence of your parents when you were a child.  How long did it take you to question what they taught you?  Have you ever questioned an authority?  Yes, we’re going back in time to Easter Bunnies and the benevolent, husky Santa Claus.  Take it a step further and ask how people eventually debunked this mythology.  Did they set up tests, traps, or hide silently in the dark with cameras?  Were they socially shamed/pressured out of their beliefs? Or – were they simply told by the same people that spun such tales that the stories weren’t true?
We gather information constantly.  How much of that information is discovered?  How much of what we learn about the world around us is told to us?  What constitutes as evidence?  What is logical?  How are we to decide what to believe?

More importantly, why does it all matter?

Simply stated – Information dictates action.

Example Scenario: If you believe (key word) that you’re heading South on Interstate 5 when your destination is South, you will not take action to travel North.  However, do you accurately know that you’re headed South?  Before, you were simply following signs, but now that you’ve demanded more evidence, you pull out a compass.  The needle indicates you’re facing North.  Now, faced with opposing information, what is the proper response?

It is time to examine the authorities consulted.  Interstate signs or compass?  Troubleshooting is most efficient when the simplest hypothesis is tested first.  Rather than investigating the inaccuracy of all the interstate signs, it would be much simpler to stop at the next gas station to find other compasses to compare yours to, speak with locals, or seek out landmarks that may indicate direction.  If the compass is found to be broken – the problem is rapidly resolved without incident. What if the compass were right, though? Would you be more likely to question the Earth’s electromagnetic field or all state and government signs along the interstate?

An area of misinformation has been discovered, and the North versus South conflict demonstrated above explains to a certain degree, how information dictates action.  More importantly, this explores the disassociation connected with authority.  Unfortunately, most people never learn to critically think on this level, or are too afraid of the conflict it may involve. This makes one highly susceptible to authority figures and/or subservience. This is not to say that authorities are wrong. Making appeals to authority is the only way to gather information on things we cannot experience for ourselves.  Despite any amount of conviction, personal experience is very weak, in itself.  In effect, our own senses can be deceitful for many reasons.

 

…to be continued in four following parts.

 

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The Relative Variable III: Exploring the Nature of Knowledge

Fore note – This blog is part of a working series:

Relative Variable I

Relative Variable II

The feedback on this modal has pointed at the necessity of explaining it in simple terms and values. So, here it goes:

Relative Variable Dynamic

1) The IHK section represents the core of all human knowledge. That is, all knowledge first extends from the individual. The IHK field is ultimately representative of subjectivity.

2) The knowledge is then passed on to cumulative human knowledge, or, CHK, when it is agreed upon with another individual. Eventually, if accepted by a society, and furthermore, accepted Trans-culturally, the case in point may be revered as a universally consistent truth. CHK represents objectivity. This is why I would personally like to see objectivity understood as a cumulative subjectivity.

3) Estimated human knowledge (EHK) extends beyond basic comprehension and verifiable measures. Yet, EHK has value in principle. A fine example of EHK is the concept of infinity. It is not easily dismissed, nor is it easily conceived. However, it can be used in philosophical and mathematical fields as a logical underpinning. This particular knowledge field has no need for variable set points because it exists on the fringe of the realism dynamic. That is, it is reaching outward – toward the unknown.

4) Absolute Reality (AR) Represents the unknown, and, by extension – Realism. Every thinking mind on the planet can agree on the fact that there are things we don’t know, or possibly, ever know.

Relativity Dynamic:

I. The Relative Variable – This (refer to arrows on the right side of the model for clarification), in my opinion, is the most important function in this dynamic. The variable set points enable the boundaries of human knowledge to flex as the respective fields of understanding evolve due to either new information, change of belief, and/or perspective(s).

II. The Relative Absolute – In this dynamic, RA is marked by the oval/circular lines. These boundaries are subject to change. Absolute in the moment, but may restructure as respective fields of understanding evolve due to either new information, change of belief, and/or perspective(s).

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…and then…Knowledge was power.

Feedback is appreciated!  Thanks!

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Shaman

A Native American shaman trots in tradition around a smoldering fire pit.  His eyes glint, and the wrinkles in his weathered face deepen as if guarding the very secrets of time.  The man chants formulas passed on to him from ancient tongues.  His hand reaches up and pulls at the sky.  His arm then rapidly whips down to the fire-less pit.  His hand delivers lightning from the sky and a fire rages up upon his touch.  This above is based on the character of a famous medicine man my parents knew.  According to them, and many others, such accounts are factual.  More powerful than lightning, a shaman can control belief.

In every culture there are representations of shamanic ritual, tradition, and practice.  In every culture there are representations of shamanic leadership.  In more primitive cultures, these figures are often spoken of as witch doctors, healers, among other titles shrouded in mystery.  Currently, there is a vast ocean of role models to choose from.  Typically, shamanic positions represent tangible connection with deeply intangible lines of logic.  It was a person granted with a shamanic role that once ascribed gods to natural phenomena.  Shamanic practice is the mother of ritual and superstition, yet has traditionally provided cohesion within communities through carrying hope and belief with it.

Naturally, the various roles of the shaman, along with mankind, have evolved.  Some shamans wear animal relics, others, a simple, understated, shirt and tie.  Some draw symbols in the sand, others draw from allegorical metaphor.  The role of the shaman, has always stood, as if in marriage, along the leadership dynamic in a group or society – if not the primary component of it.  This is the finding of trans cultural analysis.  Despite the apparent confusion of the idea, people, not need, but should have, great ideals and the mysticism of the unknown driving and furthering their intention.  Yet, mysterious inspirations should never be held as truths themselves – else, they be as ever changing as the particles beneath the fine structure of matter itself.  The authority of the shaman commands, and speaks for, belief.  This kind of prowess could cage or free a people.  That is the power it possesses.  Belief can wield the destruction of human kind.  However, inspiration, is born of the same branch.  Reason has not always rescued us, but it gains promise.

Inspiring ideas fill our intellect.  Reasoning filters it.  This is our compass – and, the only one we’ve ever known.  This compass does not point to true North, but truth itself.  Bruce Lee’s studies in philosophy are barely known, but highly useful here.  More than a chiseled martial arts master, he, as all masters of discipline, was a philosopher.  Lee spoke of two ends of a person – one, he called the “mechanical man,” the other he coined “the unscientific man.”  On one end, man is not much more than a series of conditioning, or, rote memorization.  His individuality, nonexistent.  In conflict, “the unscientific man” is the apparatus of imagining.  When creativity is taken to the extreme, any information it derives can become independent of empirical identity.  Yet, when these social behaviors are tuned in balance, each builds and connects the other.  The result is a symphony of a very evolutionary nature.  Science needs imagination to expand its empire – and imagination is meaningless without the structural identities of science.

The two human constructs gallop in tandem.  Each create the other’s design.  In realms of dreams, the shaman has served society on many levels.  Yet, the role, or – the archetypal schema, must always be represented by symbols, beings, or ideas.  In modern culture, ancient shamanic masks evaporate as society’s awareness of other cultural ideologies grows.  Like the species of its origin, the shamanic roles evolves with time.  Today, it seems, these cultural icons appear before us as magicians, scientists, rebels, charismatic, ominous, or, the most common role played – sacred.  In modern civilization, communities have been replaced by mobs.  The role of the caring shaman has been abandoned amidst the chaos.  So, who will save us from our very human insanity now that the shamans are fading mirages in the distance?  We ultimately write our own truths.  I write mine with the golden realizations those before me have found and left behind.  In poetry, art, music, film, philosophy, writing, etc… I feel that I can gauge truth for myself.  When the sparks of enlightenment are spoken by another, they are only ever recognized by one’s own measure.  The catalyzing charge released by the very seeds of our ideas is, and always has been, the magic of the shaman.  With this push from our cumulative genius, human consciousness expands into the unknown as the universe itself.

Trudge on…

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